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From left, Guerline Lambert, M.S., Lauro Takeuchi, D.M.D., Camila Irion, Ph.D., Lina Shehadeh, Ph.D., Keyvan Yousefi, Pharm.D., Joshua M. Hare, M.D., Keith Webster, Ph.D., and Trevor Eisenberg.

Researchers Gain Insight into How Heart Failure Develops in People with Chronic Kidney Disease

While insulin does not cure type 1 diabetes, it helps many people maintain healthy blood sugar levels. However, for many people suffering from type 1 brittle diabetes, insulin just isn’t enough. Fortunately, a new treatment may soon be available to help them: islet cell transplantation.

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Joshua M. Hare, M.D., with Dileep R. Yavagal, M.D.

New Study Shows Stem Cells Can Be Given Safely to Stroke Patients with Catheterization Procedure

A national study led by a University of Miami Miller School of Medicine researcher has shown that the delivery of stem cells to the brain using a tiny catheter introduced through the groin into the carotid artery in the brain is safe for patients with strokes.

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Miller School of Medicine Sets New Record in NIH Research Grant Funding

The University of Miami Miller School of Medicine received a record $133.5 million in research grants from the National Institutes of Health in Federal Fiscal Year 2018 — a $12.8 million increase over the school’s FFY 2017 total, raising the school another point to No. 40 of 147 institutions in the national rankings.

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From left: Hilit F. Mechaber, M.D., Stefanie Brown, M.D., and Rose van Zuilen, Ph.D.

Women in Academic Medicine Event Celebrates Accomplishments

They knew they were nominated, but none knew for sure who would win. Before a standing-room-only crowd, six women faculty members from specialties across the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine received recognition at the Women in Academic Medicine (WIAM) event on January 31. They stood one by one to receive awards for career achievement, mentorship, leadership or their role as trailblazers.

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Artificial Embryos Made from Stem Cells Raise Ethical Issues

Stem cells (so-called “master cells”) are unique and important in the body because they can do almost anything, and scientists have only begun to discover their potential. That’s why researchers’ use of them has created controversy, attracting the attention of scientists, policymakers, and bioethicists across the globe. Stem cells can transform into any of the body’s more than 200 cell types.

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